Private clouds: more than just buzzword bingo

A friend pointed me to a blog in which Ronald Schmelzer, an analyst at ZapThink, asserts that the term “private cloud” is nothing more than empty marketing hype. Ironically, he proposes that we instead use the term “service-oriented cloud computing.” Maybe I’m being obtuse, but “service-oriented” anything is about the most buzzladen term I’ve heard in the last five years. Seriously, have you read the SOA article on Wikipedia? It’s over 5,000 words long, chock-a-block full of the “principles of service-orientation” like “autonomy” and “composability”. What a joke!

Let me see how many words I need to define private clouds. It’s a centralized infrastructure supplied by a single organization’s IT department that provides virtualized compute resources on demand to users within that organization. Let’s see, that’s… 21 words. Not bad, but I bet if you’re like me, you’re probably looking at that and thinking that it still doesn’t make much sense, so let me give you a concrete example.
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Do more (computing) with less (hardware) (people) (money)

Imagine if you discovered your colleagues only work 4 hours a day. You thought everyone was working as hard as you until you started monitoring what they did all day. To your surprise, many of them were idle for hours at a time, just sitting still waiting for someone to give them work. And when they did work it was in 10 minute bursts separated by more waiting around. I think you would be upset if this were true. You should only get a full day’s pay if you do a full day’s work, right?
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