The last word on SCons performance

My previous look at SCons performance compared SCons and gmake on a variety of build scenarios — full, incremental, and clean. A few people suggested that I try the tips given on the SCons ‘GoFastButton’ wiki page, which are said to significantly improve SCons performance (at the cost of some accuracy, of course). Naturally, I felt that I had to do one last follow-up exploring this avenue. And since that meant I would already be running a bunch of builds, I figured I’d try out SCons’ parallel build features too. My findings follow.
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A second look at SCons performance

UPDATE: In response to comments here and elsewhere, I’ve done another series of SCons builds using the tips on the SCons ‘GoFastButton’ wiki page. You can view the results here


A few months ago, I took a look at the scalability of SCons, a popular Python-based build tool. The results were disappointing, to say the least. That post stirred up a lot of comments, both here and in other forums. Several people pointed out that a comparison with other build tools would be helpful. Some suggested that SCons’ forte is really incremental builds, rather than the full builds I used for my test. I think those are valid points, so I decided to revisit this topic. This time around, I’ve got head-to-head comparisons between SCons and GNU make, the venerable old workhorse of build tools, as I use each tool to perform full, incremental, and clean builds. Read on for the gory details — and lots of graphs. Spoiler alert: SCons still looks pretty bad.
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How scalable is SCons?

The marquee feature in ElectricAccelerator 5.0 is Electrify, a new front-end to the Accelerator cluster that allows us to distribute work from a wide variety of processes in addition to the make-based processes that we have always managed. One example is SCons, an alternative build system implemented in Python that has a small (compared to make) but apparently growing (slowly) market share. It’s sometimes touted as an ideal replacement for make, with a long list of reasons why it is considered superior. But not everybody likes it. Some have reported significant performance problems. Even the SCons maintainers agree, SCons “Can get slow on big projects”.

Of course that caught my eye, since making big projects build fast is what I do. What exactly does it mean that SCons “can get slow” on “big” projects? How slow is slow? How big is big? So to satisfy my own curiosity, and so that I might better advise customers seeking to use SCons with Electrify, I set out to answer those questions. All I needed was some free hardware and some time. Lots and lots and lots of time.

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