Interesting posts on DevOps and private/hybrid clouds

Two Three recent blogs/articles about DevOps and private/hybrid clouds:

First, Mike Maciag, our CEO, published an interesting article at CM Crossroads: How the Rise of DevOps and the Private Cloud Will Change Development in 2011.

Second, by George Watts of CA: Pragmatic Cloud: ‘Please check your egos at the door’.

Third, by Bob Aiello of CM Crossroads: Behaviorally Speaking – Devops 101.

Give them a read.

The last word on SCons performance

My previous look at SCons performance compared SCons and gmake on a variety of build scenarios — full, incremental, and clean. A few people suggested that I try the tips given on the SCons ‘GoFastButton’ wiki page, which are said to significantly improve SCons performance (at the cost of some accuracy, of course). Naturally, I felt that I had to do one last follow-up exploring this avenue. And since that meant I would already be running a bunch of builds, I figured I’d try out SCons’ parallel build features too. My findings follow.
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What’s new in GNU make 3.82

GNU make 3.82 hit the streets last week, the first new release of the workhouse build tool in over four years. Why so long between releases? To me the answer is obvious: the tool Just Works ™, so there’s no need to churn out new releases chasing the latest development fad. But as this release shows, there is still room to innovate, without compromising on the points that make the tool so great. The two improvements I find most interesting are .ONESHELL, and changes to pattern-search behavior:
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Making Automated Tests Truly Automatic

[A version of this article appeared on eWeek http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/How-to-Make-Your-Automated-Software-Tests-Truly-Automatic/%5D

A recent poll of software development professionals showed that the majority would rather be doing their taxes than dealing with their company’s test infrastructure. The reason: automated software tests require tremendous amounts of manual time and energy to configure, run, and monitor. This can be a startling revelation to companies that have invested substantial engineering efforts into automated test frameworks specifically to reduce the human cost of continually running large regression suites.

What’s at the root of this disconnect?
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Bridging the IT – Development Gap

In the last year I have increasingly run into a new character in application development shops – IT.

IT is not taking over coding tasks, but they are certainly taking a much more active role regarding where application development tasks get run.   This is no surprise, as software development has an insatiable appetite for compute resources.  Whether it is vast clusters for testing, dozens of machines to run ALM tools, or the incessant requests for “just one more box,” development teams are always asking for something.  Multiply this by the number of development teams in your company, and it is easy to see why this is a big job for IT.

IT’s response is to increasingly look at centralizing where development tasks are run.  The logic is that with a cloud of development resources, they can get more efficiency in sharing them across groups and offer their customers (development) more resources than they would otherwise get.  However, IT’s goals are largely different than those of the development teams.  IT organizations measure their success by how efficient, smooth and cost effective their compute environment is. They want a large, identically configured, scalable, uninterruptible environment that consistently delivers established levels of performance to the downstream customer.  In other words, the more that they can make things the same, the more efficient they can be.

On the surface, these goals are at odds with development.   Development teams are measured on software output and quality, not on resource efficiency.  Each development group often has unique needs to achieve peek productivity and quality.  The matrix of test environments never shrinks, in conflict with IT’s desire to standardize.  If environment customizations and optimizations make development more effective (which they often do) they want their own resources, even if it means they get fewer of them.

How do you bridge these competing goals?  The wrong answer is compromise: it’s not about finding the midpoint that’s just useless enough to each party’s goals that everyone is unhappy.

The right answer is to define an environment that can deliver against both goals simultaneously.  Allow IT to provision the compute cloud – these are the areas where homogeneity and efficiency shine.  This allows IT to meet development’s needs for peak resource demands by sharing across large pools of compute resources while reducing cost.  Virtualization is an important ingredient in the solution because it meets IT’s need for homogeneity and development’s need for configuration specialization.   However, virtualization is not enough.  What is really needed to bridge the gap is a framework that allows development to maintain control of what processes get run, who runs them, and how and when they end up on the compute cloud.

Is this possible?  Our most successful customers have used ElectricCommander to do just this.

For IT, ElectricCommander enables software development to happen in one large, scalable, reliable development cloud.  For development, they get all of the control that they need, only with a heck of a lot more compute resources.

A second look at SCons performance

UPDATE: In response to comments here and elsewhere, I’ve done another series of SCons builds using the tips on the SCons ‘GoFastButton’ wiki page. You can view the results here


A few months ago, I took a look at the scalability of SCons, a popular Python-based build tool. The results were disappointing, to say the least. That post stirred up a lot of comments, both here and in other forums. Several people pointed out that a comparison with other build tools would be helpful. Some suggested that SCons’ forte is really incremental builds, rather than the full builds I used for my test. I think those are valid points, so I decided to revisit this topic. This time around, I’ve got head-to-head comparisons between SCons and GNU make, the venerable old workhorse of build tools, as I use each tool to perform full, incremental, and clean builds. Read on for the gory details — and lots of graphs. Spoiler alert: SCons still looks pretty bad.
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Designing for high performance

Here’s the thing about high performance: you can’t just bolt it on at the end. It’s got to be baked in from day one. No doubt those of you who are experienced developers are now invoking the venerable Donald Knuth, who once said, “Premature optimization is the root of all evil.” But look at it this way: with very rare exceptions, no amount of performance tuning will turn an average system into a world class competitor.

Of course, high performance is the entire raison d’être for ElectricAccelerator. We knew from the start that parallelism would be the primary means of achieving our performance goals (although it’s not the only trick we used). Thanks to Amdahl’s law, we know that in order to accelerate a build by 100x, the serialized portion cannot be more than 1% of the baseline time. Thus it’s critical that absolutely everything that can be parallelized, is parallelized. And I mean everything, even the stuff that you don’t normally think about, because anything that doesn’t get parallelized disproportionately saps our performance. Anything that isn’t parallelized is a bottleneck.
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